All posts filed under: Immigrants

Every Dish Has a Story: Mapping My Food History | TEDxPiscataquaRiver

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Art and Culture / Cocina Criolla / Food / Immigrants / Latinos / Media / Puerto Rico / Race / Videos / Women

This spring I was gave a talk about identity, family,Puerto Rican culture, and mofongo at TEDx PiscataquaRiver.  Watch it on YouTube, or read the full transcript below. [TRANSCRIPT]* Every Dish Has a Story: Mapping My Food History  I love mofongo… It’s a traditional Puerto Rican dish made by frying, then smashing green plantains, then adding garlic, olive oil, and chicharrón or fried pork skins. It’s super rico … really delicious. If you haven’t had mofongo before, maybe you’re looking at this image […]

Padres

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Immigrants / Latinos / Media / NPR's Morning Edition / Radio / StoryCorps

This past Father’s Day, I co-produced and co-hosted a podcast featuring some pretty awesome dads. Among them is Mario Loiseu, a Haitian immigrant who works two jobs, including long hours as a parking lot attendant in New York City. He does this to help pay for his 9-year-old daughter, Mabou’s, tutoring. She is a science and language prodigy, and is already studying college-level algebra. On the StoryCorps Podcast, I co-hosted an episode with Michael Garofalo […]

Three Generations, One Cookbook, and Memories of Puerto Rico

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Cocina Criolla / Food / Immigrants / Latinos / Puerto Rico / Videos / Women

Originally published on August 25, 2014 as part of Feet in 2 Worlds Coming to the Table issue. My grandmother, known fondly as “Tata,” inspired me to start cooking. It was because of her that I started the Cocina Criolla project—where I’m cooking my way through the classic Puerto Rican cookbook by the same name. When I began the project, I was immediately transported back to Puerto Rico, standing in my grandmother’s kitchen while she […]

Bronx Baker Turns Dominican Cakes Into A Sweet American Dream

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Food / Immigrants / Women

Originally published on August 26, 2014 on NPR’s The Salt. For many immigrants arriving in the U.S., opening a family food business can be a pathway to economic stability. While many fail, one Dominican woman in the Bronx has managed to get her family off food stamps, send her kids to college and share her heritage with new friends and neighbors. And it all started with cake. Not just any cake — but bizcocho Dominicano, […]

DREAMers No Longer of One Mind on Immigration Reform

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Feet in Two Worlds / Immigrants / Immigration Reform / Latinos / Media / Politics / Radio / WNYC

Originally published on June 27, 2014 on WNYC. June is an exciting month for graduating high school seniors. But for the thousands of young immigrants who lack legal status, graduation day can be a moment of great uncertainty. Undocumented youth have been on the front lines of the struggle for immigrant rights. They call themselves DREAMers to evoke both the proposed federal DREAM Act and a hope that they, too, can achieve the American Dream. […]

Podcast: DREAMers No More—What is Happening to Young, Undocumented Immigrant Activists?

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Feet in Two Worlds / Immigrants / Immigration News / Immigration Reform / Latinos

Listen to the podcast. Originally published on Feet in 2 Worlds on May 7, 2014. The DREAMer movement is in flux. Once monolithic, political activism by young, undocumented immigrants has become fragmented, with some activists abandoning the fight for comprehensive immigration reform, and others focused on local efforts to support undocumented immigrants. Many have stopped calling themselves DREAMers. In New York, where an estimated 90,000 youth would be eligible for relief under the DREAM Act, some young activists […]

Recipes for a New Kind of Thanksgiving

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Art and Culture / Food / Immigrants

Originally published on Colorlines on November 22, 2013. Despite the political tensions surrounding Thanksgiving, it’s a holiday many use to unite with family and friends. And what ends up on the table is often a tweaked version of the usual fare that better matches the heritage and politics of the celebrants. For some that means looking to food history to incorporate forgotten ingredients that were essential to their ancestors or focusing on local, sustainable ingredients. For others, […]

Mapping Food Justice

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Food Justice / Immigrants

Originally published on Colorlines on October 24, 2013. Check out The Color of Food interactive map on Brown Girl Farming. Natasha Bowens describes herself as a “young, brown female who likes to farm.” And while she didn’t grow up doing it, she’s now dedicated her career to creating a network of other people of color in farming and food justice. Like many people Bowens became an activist in college, and focused her early career working on the 2008 […]